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Safety Recommendation Details

Safety Recommendation A-05-030
Details
Synopsis: On May 9, 2004, about 1450 Atlantic standard time, Executive Airlines (doing business as American Eagle) flight 5401, an Avions de Transport Regional (ATR) 72-212, N438AT, skipped once, bounced hard twice, and then crashed at Luis Muñoz Marin International Airport, San Juan, Puerto Rico. The airplane came to a complete stop on a grassy area about 217 feet left of the runway 8 centerline and about 4,317 feet beyond the runway threshold. The captain was seriously injured; the first officer, 2 flight attendants, and 16 of the 22 passengers received minor injuries; and the remaining 6 passengers received no injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 121 as a scheduled passenger flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which operated on an instrument flight rules flight plan.
Recommendation: TO THE FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION: Require all 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121 and 135 air carriers to incorporate bounced landing recovery techniques in their flight manuals and to teach these techniques during initial and recurrent training.
Original recommendation transmittal letter: PDF
Overall Status: Open Acceptable Alternate Response
Mode: Aviation
Location: San Juan, PR, United States
Is Reiterated: No
Is Hazmat: No
Is NPRM: No
Accident #: DCA04MA045
Accident Reports: Crash During Landing, Executive Airlines Flight 5401, Avions de Transport Regional 72-212, N438AT
Report #: AAR-05-02
Accident Date: 5/9/2004
Issue Date: 9/26/2005
Date Closed:
Addressee(s) and Addressee Status: FAA (Open Acceptable Alternate Response)
Keyword(s): Flightcrew

Safety Recommendation History
From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 7/11/2019
Response: -From Daniel K. Elwell, Acting Administrator: On March 30, 2016, the FAA published the Flight Simulation Training Device Qualification Standards for Extended Envelope and Adverse Weather Event Training Tasks Final Rule (81 FR 18177). This final rule amends the qualification performance standards for flight simulation training devices (FSTD) to improve existing and introduce new technical standards for full stall and stick pusher maneuvers, upset recognitions and recovery maneuvers, maneuvers conducted in airborne icing conditions, takeoff and landing maneuvers in gusting crosswinds, and bounced landing recovery maneuvers. This final rule also updates the FSTD technical standards to better align with the current international FSTD evaluation guidance, and introduces a new FSTD level expanding the number of qualified flight training tasks in a fixed-base flight training device. Pending the Board's review of the final rule, the FAA will consider further action to address these safety recommendations.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 7/21/2016
Response: The November 12, 2013, crewmember and dispatcher training final rule requires the recommended bounced landing recovery training, but only for Part 121 operators. The final rule that revised Part 60 contains, in Table A1A, QPS Requirements, entry 2.d.2, “Ground Reaction,” the requirements necessary for an FSTD to be used for the recommended training on bounced landing recovery. On June 9, 2006, you issued Safety Alert for Operators (SAFO) 06005, “Bounced Landing Training,” which recommended that each Part 121 or 135 airline check to see that bounced landing recovery techniques were included in manuals used by their pilots and in pilots’ initial ground training, and to ensure that these same techniques are reinforced by briefings and debriefings during flight training, supervised operating experience, and line checks. We have previously questioned the statement in the SAFO that “bounced landing recovery procedures cannot be adequately replicated in a flight simulator and should not be deliberately performed in an airplane.” In correspondence related to Safety Recommendation A 05-30, you said that the FSTDs available in 2006 were not capable of adequately replicating a bounced landing recovery scenario; therefore, the SAFO could not recommend use of an FSTD for bounced landing recovery flight training. However, on January 21, 2014, you indicated that, after the final rule revising Part 60 was published, you would issue a new SAFO to recommend that Part 135 operators incorporate bounced landing recovery training into flight training programs conducted in an FSTD. Accordingly, you currently need to make such revisions to SAFO 06005. We have also expressed concern about how you confirm that operators have taken the actions recommended in SAFOs. You stated that you believe SAFO 06005 should satisfy this recommendation, but the responsibility to implement any action recommended in a SAFO rests with the operator. We have indicated that a revised SAFO would be an acceptable alternate response to this recommendation if you can confirm that all Part 135 operators have adopted the recommendations made in the SAFO. Pending revisions to SAFO 06005 based on the Part 60 final rule, and confirmation that Part 135 operators have adopted the recommendations made in those revisions, Safety Recommendation A-05-30 remains classified OPEN—ACCEPTABLE ALTERNATE RESPONSE.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 10/2/2014
Response: We have reviewed the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) titled “Flight Simulation Training Device Qualification Standards for Extended Envelope and Adverse Weather Event Training Tasks,” published at Federal Register 39462-39753 on July 10, 2014. Although the NPRM does not discuss Safety Recommendation A-05-30, the November 12, 2013, crewmember and dispatcher training final rule requires the recommended bounced landing recovery training, but only for Part 121 operators. The proposed requirements in the NPRM related to FSTD standards for a bounced landing recovery scenario are necessary to implement the requirement in the November 2013 final rule. The final rule does not cover Part 135 operations. However, on June 9, 2006, the FAA issued Safety Alert for Operators (SAFO) 06005, “Bounced Landing Training,” recommending that each Part 121 or 135 airline check to see that bounced landing recovery techniques were included in manuals used by their pilots and in pilots’ initial ground training, and that these same techniques are reinforced by briefings and debriefings during flight training, supervised operating experience, and line checks. We have previously questioned the statement in the SAFO that “bounced landing recovery procedures cannot be adequately replicated in a flight simulator and should not be deliberately performed in an airplane.” In correspondence related to Safety Recommendation A 05-30, the FAA said that FSTDs were not currently capable of adequately replicating a bounced landing recovery scenario and therefore, the FAA could not recommend in the SAFO such flight training at the present time. However, the FAA indicated that the NPRM to revise Part 60 (which is the NPRM published on July 10, 2014) would include changes needed to accomplish bounced landing recovery training. The FAA indicated that after a final rule based on the NPRM is published, it will issue a new SAFO recommending that operators incorporate into their flight training programs bounced landing recovery training using an FSTD. We have also expressed concern about how the FAA confirms that operators have taken the actions in SAFOs. Revisions to SAFO 06005 based on this NPRM will be necessary for an acceptable closure of Safety Recommendation A-05-30, which is currently classified “Open—Acceptable Alternate Response.”

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 3/18/2014
Response: On November 12, 2013, you published a final rule, “Qualification, Service, and Use of Crewmembers and Aircraft Dispatchers,” which contains a requirement that Part 121 pilots undergo bounced landing recovery training in a simulator and satisfies this recommendation for Part 121 operations. The final rule does not cover Part 135 operations, however. On June 9, 2006, the FAA issued Safety Alert for Operators (SAFO) 06005, “Bounced Landing Training,” recommending that each Part 121 or 135 airline check to see that bounced landing recovery techniques are included in manuals used by their pilots and in pilots’ initial ground training, and that these same techniques are reinforced by briefings and debriefings during flight training, supervised operating experience, and line checks. In April 2009, the FAA asked the Airlines for America Association (A4A) and the Regional Airline Association (RAA) to poll Part 121 and Part 135 member carriers to determine whether they had incorporated bounced landing training into their programs, as the SAFO suggests. Both organizations reported 100 percent implementation of the SAFO’s recommendations. The FAA believed that issuance of the SAFO, together with the information provided by the A4A and the RAA, would satisfy this recommendation. On September 20, 2012, we replied that we did not agree that you had satisfied the recommendation through the actions taken. We had pointed out, in our comments on the supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking that was the basis for the November 12, 2013, final rule, that we supported your conclusion that only a full flight simulator would suffice for bounced landing recovery training. However, this conclusion was not consistent with the guidance contained in SAFO 06005 that “bounced landing recovery procedures cannot be adequately replicated in a flight simulator and should not be deliberately performed in an airplane.” Although you have not proposed a requirement for bounced landing recovery training in a simulator for Part 135 operators similar to that contained in the final rule for Part 121 operators, we stated in our September 20, 2012, letter that (1) updating the SAFO to be consistent with what is now contained in the final rule and (2) verifying that all Part 135 operators had adopted the revised guidance would constitute an acceptable alternate solution. Your recent letter responded to these two issues. With regard to the first issue of inconsistencies between the SAFO and the final rule regarding the use of a flight simulator training device (FSTD) for bounced landing recovery training, you stated that FSTDs are not currently capable of adequately replicating bounced landing recovery and, therefore, you cannot recommend such flight training at the present time in the SAFO. However, you have initiated rulemaking to revise Part 60, “Flight Simulation Training Device Initial and Continuing Qualification and Use,” so that FSTDs with the capabilities needed to comply with the November 12, 2013, final rule requirements will be available, including changes needed to accomplish bounced landing recovery training. We acknowledge that current Part 60 requirements are not adequate for bounced landing recovery training, and we await the release of the notice of proposed rulemaking to revise Part 60. Your recent letter clarified that, after the final rule revising Part 60 is published, you will issue a new SAFO recommending that Part 135 operators incorporate into their flight training programs bounced landing recovery training using an FSTD. With regard to the second issue, verifying that all Part 135 operators have adopted the revised guidance in the SAFO, you stated that the responsibility to implement any action recommended in a SAFO rests with the operator, and that it is not normal practice for you to assess compliance with such a recommendation. We have previously expressed concern that a SAFO is not an effective substitute for a requirement. In past and current investigations, we have frequently found that neither the operator nor regional FAA personnel providing oversight of the operator were even aware of, let alone following, guidance contained in relevant SAFOs. For example, as a result of our investigation of the February 12, 2009, crash in Clarence Center, New York, of Colgan Continental Connection flight 3407, a Bombardier DHC 8 400, while on approach to Buffalo Niagara International Airport, Buffalo, New York, on February 23, 2010, we issued Safety Recommendation A-10-31 to the FAA: A-10-31 Implement a process to document that all 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121, 135, and 91K operators have taken appropriate action in response to safety critical information transmitted through the safety alert for operators process or another method. In your September 24, 2012, letter regarding Safety Recommendation A-10-31, you stated that the intent of a SAFO was to disseminate directly to operators important safety information that is often critical, but that the responsibility to implement any action recommended in a SAFO rests with the operator. You also stated that you did not intend to develop your own process for tracking operator action in response to safety-critical information, as recommended. At that time, you proposed that a coming requirement for Part 121 (not Part 135) operators to develop and implement safety management systems (SMS) would address operators’ responding appropriately to guidance provided in SAFOs. On February 7, 2013, we replied that a mature SMS would (1) provide operators with the tools and framework to potentially manage safety proactively and (2) provide the FAA with a systematic approach for evaluating the effectiveness of operators’ management of safety?including actions taken in response to safety-critical information transmitted through the SAFO process or another method. Although we recognized the benefits of implementing an SMS, we emphasized that transmitting safety critical information to operators without measuring results was inconsistent with the basic principles of SMS. Accordingly, on February 7, 2013, Safety Recommendation A-10-31 was classified “Open—Unacceptable Response.” Were a SAFO effective in bringing about the needed action, it might constitute an acceptable alternate response to the part of Safety Recommendation A-05-30 addressing Part 135 operations. But issuance of the SAFO does not constitute an acceptable response without any followup or verification that the safety information is actually being disseminated and that appropriate responses from Part 135 operators are resulting. Therefore, although revision of the SAFO is part of an acceptable alternate response, it will not alone constitute the basis for closure of Safety Recommendation A-05-30 without action adequate to satisfy Safety Recommendation A-10-31. Accordingly, pending revisions to SAFO 06005 after the Part 60 revisions are completed, and our receipt of a response that satisfies Safety Recommendation A 10 31, Safety Recommendation A-05-30 remains classified OPEN--ACCEPTABLE ALTERNATE RESPONSE.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 1/21/2014
Response: -From Michael P. Huerta, Administrator: As stated in the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) letter dated January 4, 2012, the FAA issued on June 9, 2006, Safety Alert for Operators (SAFO) 06005, Bounced Landing Training for certificate holders operating under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations ( 14 CFR) parts 121 and 135. The SAFO recommends that each part 121 or 135 operator include bounced land ing recovery techniques in manuals used by their pilots and in initial ground training for each of the airplane types that the operator flies. Additionally, the Qualification, Service, and Use of Crewmember and Aircraft Dispatchers Final Rule includes a requirement for bounced landing recovery training. In its letter dated September 20, 2012, the Board indicated that the guidance contained in SAFO 06005 and the requirement proposed in the final rule was inconsi stent. The SAFO states that bounced landing recovery procedures cannot be adequately replicated in a flight simulator and should not be deliberately performed in an airplane, while the final rule proposes bounced landing recovery training in a tl ight simulator as a requirement. We emphasize that full flight simulators (FFS) are not currently capable of adequately replicating bounced landing recovery and therefore, we cannot recommend such flight training at the present time. For this reason we recommended in the SAFO that bounced landing recovery be addressed in ground training. In order for the FFS training recommended in the SNPRM to be accomplished, the FAA initiated rulemaking to amend part 60, Flight Simulation Training Device Initial and Continuing Qualification and Use. The revision to par1 60 will address the FFS changes needed to accomplish bounced landing recovery. The part 60 application for rulemaking was approved by the FAA Rulemaking Council on November 1, 2011, and a team was named by the Council to proceed with the next stage of the rulemaking process. We are currently drafting the part 60 notice of proposed rulemaking and expect to publish it by May 2014. The FAA finds that this added functionality to FFSs, combined with the requirement of the final rule for part 121 air carriers to conduct the training, will achieve the bounced landing recovery training requested by the Board for part 121 operators. After the part 60 final rule revision is published, the FAA will issue a new SAFO to recommend that part 135 operators incorporate bounced landing recovery training into flight training programs conducted in an FFS. The FAA finds that the SAFO is an appropriate action in response to this recommendation. SAFOs alert industry regarding issues of concern that do not rise to the level of requiring mandatory corrective action. The responsibility to implement any action recommended in a SAFO rests with the operator. The FAA finds that this is the best way to address concerns about bounced landing recovery for part 135 operators, rather than an additional rulemaking solution given our limited resources. On occasion, the FAA assesses industry's follow-up to a SAFO, but this is not normal practice. While the FAA is not planning to survey compliance with the new SAFO, the FAA does recognize a SAFO identifies a potential risk and adjusts surveillance to address identified risks. I will provide an update to the Board on the status of this safety recommendation by July 2014.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 9/20/2012
Response: The NTSB does not agree that the FAA has fully addressed this recommendation through the actions that it has taken thus far. In our comments to the docket for the FAA’s Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (SNPRM), titled “Qualification, Service, and Use of Crewmember and Aircraft Dispatchers,” we supported the FAA’s conclusion that only a full flight simulator would suffice for bounced landing recovery training. We point out, however, that this conclusion is not consistent with the guidance contained in Safety Alert for Operators (SAFO) 06005, “Bounced Landing Training,” which states that “bounced landing recovery procedures cannot be adequately replicated in a flight simulator and should not be deliberately performed in an airplane.” We continue to believe that, if included in a final rule, the SNPRM’s proposed requirement for bounced landing recovery training for Part 121 operators is responsive to this recommendation. Although the FAA has not proposed a similar requirement for Part 135 operators, we believe that updating the SAFO and verifying that all Part 135 operators have adopted the revised guidance would constitute an acceptable alternate solution. Accordingly, pending the inclusion of the SNPRM’s proposed requirement for bounced landing recovery training in a final rule and confirmation that all Part 135 operators have adopted the guidance contained in the revised SAFO, Safety Recommendation A-05-30 is classified OPEN—ACCEPTABLE ALTERNATE RESPONSE.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 6/20/2012
Response: -From Tony Fazio, Director, Accident Investigation and Prevention: As noted in our January 4,20 12 letter to the Board, the FAA issued Safety Alert for Operators (SAFO) 06005, Bounced Landing Training for Certificate Holders Operating Under 14 CFR Parts 121 and 135, on June 9, 2006. The SAFO recommends that each 14 CFR Part 121 or 135 operator check to see that bounced landing recovery techniques are included in the manuals used by their pilots and in their initial ground training for each of the airplane types that the airline flies. In April 2009, we worked with both the Airline Transport Association (now Airlines for America) and the Regional Airline Association to determine that 100 percent of part 121 and 135 operators have complied with and implemented the SAFO's recommendations and have incorporated bounced landing training into their programs. While we have supplemented this with the Qualification, Service, and Use of Crew member and Aircraft Dispatchers supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking, which includes a proposed requirement for bounced landing recovery training for certificate holders required to train under Part 121, the FAA has already effectively addressed this recommendation through issuing the SAFO in 2006 and ensuring 100 percent compliance among the affected operators in 2009. In addition, since the proposed rulemaking effort does not explicitly include all 14 CFR part 135 operators, the SAFO more effectively addresses this recommendation, since it does include all affected operators. We carefully reconsidered our actions, and we continue to find that our response to this safety recommendation reflects the best interests of aviation safety. Accordingly, we will take no further action in direct response to this safety recommendation.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 3/6/2012
Response: On June 9, 2006, the FAA issued Safety Alert for Operators (SAFO) 06005, “Bounced Landing Training,” which recommended that each Part 121 or 135 airline check to see that bounced landing recovery techniques are included in the manuals used by their pilots and in their initial ground training, and that these same techniques are reinforced by briefings and debriefings during flight training, supervised operating experience, and line checks. On February 15, 2007, we pointed out that the SAFO was a recommendation from the FAA, not a requirement. Accordingly, in order to ensure that issuance of the SAFO had the same effect as the recommended requirement—that airlines train their pilots in bounced landing recovery techniques during initial and recurrent training—we asked the FAA to determine how many carriers had adopted the recommendations made in SAFO 06005. To assess the effectiveness of the SAFO, on April 23, 2009, the FAA issued Notice N8900.71, “Verification of Bounced Landing Training (parts 121, 135, and 91K) and Remedial Training (part 121),” which directed FAA inspectors to review their assigned carrier’s response to the SAFO and report this information back to headquarters. Unfortunately, the response from the FAA inspectors was not sufficient to report. As an alternative, the FAA asked the Air Transport Association (now known as “Airlines for America” [A4A]) and the Regional Airline Association (RAA) to poll Part 121 and Part 135 member carriers to discover whether they had incorporated bounced landing training into their programs, as the SAFO suggests. Both organizations reported 100 percent implementation of the SAFO’s recommendations. The FAA believes that these actions fully satisfy this recommendation. On May 20, 2011, the FAA published a Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (SNPRM), titled “Qualification, Service, and Use of Crewmember and Aircraft Dispatchers,” which includes a proposed requirement for bounced landing recovery training, as recommended. In our comments to the docket for the SNPRM we indicated that, if the proposed requirement were included in the final rule, the action would fully satisfy this recommendation. The FAA, however, believes that the proposed training in the rule is a supplement to voluntary actions the FAA has already taken on this issue, and that it is not necessary to wait for the final rule for the recommendation to be closed. Although the FAA’s action in asking for the assistance of the A4A and RAA was an effective and appropriate interim action in response to the failure of many FAA inspectors to take the action specified in Notice N8900.71, the NTSB does not agree that the FAA has fully addressed this recommendation through the already-implemented voluntary actions. Accordingly, pending the inclusion of the SNPRM’s proposed requirement for bounced landing recovery training in a final rule, Safety Recommendation A-05-30 remains classified OPEN—ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 1/4/2012
Response: -From Michael P. Huerta, Acting Administrator: On June 9, 2006, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued Safety Alert for Operators (SAFO) 06005, Bounced Landing Training for certificate holders operating under Title 14 of the Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) parts 121 and 135 (previously provided). This SAFO recommends that each part 121 or 135 airline check to see that bounced landing recovery techniques are included in the manuals used by their pilots and in their initial ground training for each of the airplane types that the airline flies. The SAFO also recommends that those same techniques are reinforced by briefings and debriefings during flight training, supervised operating experience, and line checks. The SAFO includes instructions on how to develop this information on bounced landing recovery techniques if it is not already addressed by the carrier. The Board stated, in its letter dated February 15, 2007, that the action taken by the FAA is acceptable pending results from a survey of part 121 and 135 carriers that demonstrates they have adopted the recommendations of SAFO 06005. To assess the effectiveness of the SAFO, on April 23, 2009, the FAA issued Notice N 8900.71, Verification of Bounced Landing Training (parts 121, 135, and 91K) and Remedial Training (part 121). The response from the inspectors was not sufficient to report, so the FAA enlisted the assistance of the Air Transport Association (now known as Airlines for America) and the Regional Airline Association to poll part 121 and 135 member carriers to find out if they incorporated bounced landing training into their program as SAFO 06005 suggests. Both organizations reported 100 percent implementation of the SAPO's recommendations. As the Board noted in its comments to Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (SNPRM), Qualification, Service, and Use of Crewmember and Aircraft Dispatchers, published on May 20, 2011, this SNPRM includes a proposed requirement for bounced landing recovery training. The FAA feels the proposed training in the rule is a supplement to voluntary actions the FAA has already taken on this issue. I believe that the FAA has effectively addressed this recommendation through the already implemented voluntary actions noted above, and I consider our actions complete.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 7/15/2011
Response: Notation 8106A: The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has reviewed the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking (SNPRM) titled "Qualification, Service, and Use of Crewmembers and Aircraft Dispatchers," published at 76 Federal Register 29336-29526 on May 20, 2011. The notice proposes to amend the regulations for flight and cabin crewmember and aircraft dispatcher training programs in domestic, flag, and supplemental operations. The proposed regulations are intended to contribute significantly to reducing aviation accidents by requiring the use of flight simulation training devices (FSTD) for flight crewmembers and including additional training and evaluation requirements for all crewmembers and aircraft dispatchers in areas that are critical to safety. The proposal also reorganizes and revises the qualification, training, and evaluation requirements. The SNPRM is based on the FAA's review of comments submitted in response to the January 12, 2009, notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) on these issues and its determination that the NPRM did not adequately address or clarify some topics; it is also based on provisions of the Airline Safety and Federal Aviation Administration Extension Act of 2010. Unlike the earlier NPRM, the SNPRM contains extensive discussion of the requirements for bounced landing recovery training, although it does not explicitly mention Safety Recommendation A-05-30. The NTSB supports the FAA conclusion that only a full flight simulator would suffice for this training. The SNPRM also discusses Safety Recommendations A-00-93 and -94, both of which are closed. If the final rule resulting from the SNPRM retains the provisions regarding bounced landing recovery training, this likely will be an acceptable response to this recommendation, and it will be closed.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 5/7/2009
Response: Notation 8106: The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) has reviewed the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) titled, "Qualification, Service, and Use of Crewmembers and Aircraft Dispatchers," which was published in 74 Federal Register 1280 on January 12, 2009. Although the NPRM contains detailed requirements for training on landing, the NTSB did not see anything in the NPRM related to bounced landing recovery techniques. This recommendation is currently classified "Open-Acceptable Alternate Response" pending the results of a survey indicating that all operators' training programs include the recommendations in a safety alert for operators.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 2/15/2007
Response: On June 9, 2006, the FAA issued Safety Alert for Operators (SAFO) 06005, which recommends that each Part 121 or 135 airline check to see that bounced landing recovery techniques are included in the manuals used by their pilots, and in their initial ground training for each of the airplane types that the airline flies; and that those same techniques are reinforced by briefings and debriefings during flight training, supervised operating experience, and line checks. The SAFO also includes instructions on how to develop this information on bounced landing recovery techniques if it is not already addressed by the carrier. The Safety Board notes that a SAFO is not a requirement; rather, it is a recommendation from the FAA. In order to ensure that issuance of the SAFO fully meets the intent of this recommendation to require that airlines train their pilots in bounced landing recovery techniques during initial and recurrent training, the Board asks the FAA to survey Part 121 and 135 carriers to determine how many have adopted the recommendations in SAFO 06005. Pending results from a survey of Part 121and 135 carriers that demonstrates that they have adopted the recommendations of the SAFO, Safety Recommendation A-05-30 is classified OPEN -- ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 12/21/2005
Response: Letter Mail Controlled 1/3/2006 12:11:35 PM MC# 2060009: - From Marion C. Blakey, Administrator: The Federal Aviation Administration agrees with the intent of this recommendation. To address this safety issue, the FAA will issue a Safety Alert for Operators (SAFO) recommending that each 14 CFR Part 121 certificate holder and each 14 CFR Part 135 certificate holder do the following: Every certificate holder should check to see that bounced landing recovery techniques are explicitly addressed (1) in the manuals used by their pilots, and (2) in their initial ground training, for each of the airplane types that they may fly; and (3) further check that those same techniques are reinforced by briefings and debriefings during flight training, supervised operating experience, and line checks. If bounced landings are not explicitly addressed, each certificate holder should consult the applicable airplane flight manual and the flightcrew operating and training manuals offered by the manufacturer to determine the recovery techniques recommended for each airplane, respectively. Failing to find recommended recovery techniques in any of those sources, each certificate holder should contact the appropriate FAA Aircraft Evaluation Group for specific techniques recommended by the manufacturer and acceptable to the FAA. Each certificate holder should revise the manuals used by its pilots, the initial ground training for its pilots, and its flight training, its supervision of operating experience, and its procedures for line checks as necessary to address recommended bounced landing recovery techniques. It is anticipated that the SAFO will be issued by March 2006. I will provide the Board with a copy of the SAFO as soon as it is issued.