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Safety Recommendation Details

Safety Recommendation A-10-081
Details
Synopsis: On January 15, 2009, about 1527 eastern standard time,1 US Airways flight 1549, an Airbus Industrie A320-214, N106US, experienced an almost total loss of thrust in both engines after encountering a flock of birds and was subsequently ditched on the Hudson River about 8.5 miles from LaGuardia Airport (LGA), New York City, New York. The flight was en route to Charlotte Douglas International Airport (CLT), Charlotte, North Carolina, and had departed LGA about 2 minutes before the in-flight event occurred. The 150 passengers, including a lap-held child, and 5 crewmembers evacuated the airplane via the forward and overwing exits. One flight attendant and four passengers received serious injuries, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The scheduled, domestic passenger flight was operating under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 121 on an instrument flight rules flight plan. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident.
Recommendation: TO THE FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION: Require 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 121, Part 135, and Part 91 Subpart K operators to provide information about life lines, if the airplane is equipped with them, to passengers to ensure that the life lines can be quickly and effectively retrieved and used.
Original recommendation transmittal letter: PDF
Overall Status: Open Acceptable Alternate Response
Mode: Aviation
Location: Weehawken, NJ, United States
Is Reiterated: No
Is Hazmat: No
Is NPRM: No
Accident #: DCA09MA026
Accident Reports: Loss of Thrust in Both Engines, US Airways Flight 1549 Airbus Industrie A320-214, N106US
Report #: AAR-10-03
Accident Date: 1/15/2009
Issue Date: 5/21/2010
Date Closed:
Addressee(s) and Addressee Status: FAA (Open Acceptable Alternate Response)
Keyword(s): Training and Education,Water Survival

Safety Recommendation History
From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 10/12/2016
Response: On July 8, 2013, we said that your plan to revise advisory circular (AC) 121-24C, “Passenger Safety Information Briefing and Briefing Cards,” to incorporate information about the use of life lines constituted an acceptable alternate means of satisfying this recommendation. We note that your Civil Aerospace Medical Institute (CAMI) has finalized a report that could significantly impact the AC, and that you are currently incorporating this information into the new AC. We request that you send us a copy of the CAMI report when it is available. Pending issuance of an AC that addresses informing passengers about life-line use, Safety Recommendation A-10-081 remains classified OPEN—ACCEPTABLE ALTERNATE RESPONSE.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 9/12/2016
Response: -From Michael P. Huerta, Administrator: As stated in our March 14. 20 13 letter, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is in the process of revising Advisory Circular (AC) 121-24C, Passenger Safety Information Briefing and Briefing Cards. Although there have been significant delays in the revision process, we have made important progress. The Protection and Survival Research Laboratory at the FAA ·s Civil Aerospace Medical Institute has finalized a report which could have a significant impact on the AC. We are currently in the process of harmonizing information from the report and incorporating supporting tools for clarity. Once our internal review is complete, we will post the AC for public comment. Any comments received will be evaluated and resolved prior to final publication. We anticipate completion of the AC in late 2017. I will keep the Board informed of the FAA· s progress on this safety recommendation and update the Board by December 2017.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 7/8/2013
Response: We believe that the FAA’s plan to revise Advisory Circular 121-24C, “Passenger Safety Information Briefing and Briefing Cards,” to incorporate information about the use of life lines constitutes an acceptable alternate means of addressing this recommendation. Accordingly, pending completion of this action, Safety Recommendation A-10-81 is classified OPEN—ACCEPTABLE ALTERNATE RESPONSE.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 3/14/2013
Response: -From Michael P. Huerta, Administrator: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) agrees that additional information related to life lines would enhance passenger awareness of this assistive device. We completed a review of the available guidance related to life lines and initiated a revision to Advisory Circular (AC) 121-24C, Passenger Safety Information Briefing and Briefing Cards. The revision will incorporate information about the use of life lines into the AC. This AC would affect part 121, 135, and 91 subpart K operations. We anticipate publishing the revised AC by 2014. Until we have completed this revision, we note that Part 121 , 135, and 91 subpart K operators are already required to carry briefing cards in the aircraft which contain instructions necessary for the use of emergency equipment on board the aircraft. The intent of the AC is to clarify that these cards should include information on life lines, if they are in the aircraft. I will keep the Board informed of OUT progress on this safety recommendation and provide an update by January 2014.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 3/17/2011
Response: The FAA’s plan to review and revise existing guidance as well as develop new guidance materials related to the use of life lines is responsive to this recommendation. Pending completion of those action, Safety Recommendation A-10-81 is classified OPEN – ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 9/23/2010
Response: CC# 201000368: - From J. Randolph Babbitt, Administrator: We understand that the Board believes that life lines could have assisted passengers during the evacuation of US Airways flight 1549. Historical evidence has shown that many inadvertent water landings are survivable, and survival equipment that is easy to access and use may be the only means of survival for passengers and crewmembers awaiting rescue. While it is true that life lines are required for extended overwater aircraft to assist passengers during emergency egress using over wing exits, the primary purpose of life lines are to stabilize passengers during the boarding of rafts or slide rafts. Flight attendants have been trained to instruct a passenger to crawl out onto the wing after opening the exit, to position the life line, and to attach a hook on the end of the life line to a wing attach fitting. The training for this procedure is part of a planned ditching scenario for an extended overwater aircraft. We agree that additional information related to life lines would enhance passenger awareness of this assistive device. We will conduct a review and revise existing guidance as well as develop new guidance materials related to the use of life lines, as necessary.