Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
Safety Recommendation Details

Safety Recommendation A-17-042
Details
Synopsis: On June 25, 2015, about 1215 Alaska daylight time, a single-engine, turbine-powered, float-equipped de Havilland DHC-3 (Otter) airplane, N270PA, collided with mountainous, tree-covered terrain about 24 miles east-northeast of Ketchikan, Alaska. The commercial pilot and eight passengers sustained fatal injuries, and the airplane was destroyed. The airplane was owned by Pantechnicon Aviation, of Minden, Nevada, and operated by Promech Air, Inc., of Ketchikan. The flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135 as an on-demand sightseeing flight; a company visual flight rules flight plan (by which the company performed its own flight-following) was in effect. Marginal visual flight rules conditions were reported in the area at the time of the accident. The flight departed about 1207 from Rudyerd Bay about 44 miles east-northeast of Ketchikan and was en route to the operator’s base at the Ketchikan Harbor Seaplane Base, Ketchikan.
Recommendation: TO THE FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION: Analyze automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast data from Ketchikan air tour operations on an ongoing basis and meet annually with Ketchikan air tour operators to engage in a nonpunitive discussion of any operational hazards reflected in the data and collaborate on mitigation strategies for any hazards identified.
Original recommendation transmittal letter: PDF
Overall Status: Open - Acceptable Response
Mode: Aviation
Location: Ketchikan, AK, United States
Is Reiterated: No
Is Hazmat: No
Is NPRM: No
Accident #: ANC15MA041
Accident Reports: Collision with Terrain Promech Air, Inc. de Havilland DHC-3, N270PA, Ketchikan, Alaska, June 25, 2015
Report #: AAR-17-02
Accident Date: 6/25/2015
Issue Date: 5/9/2017
Date Closed:
Addressee(s) and Addressee Status: FAA (Open - Acceptable Response)
Keyword(s):

Safety Recommendation History
From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 10/26/2017
Response: You wrote that you have identified several portions of Ketchikan air tour flight paths where ADS-B data is not available. You also indicated that, although commercial GPS tracking tools are available, full flight path coverage is only available to air carriers. We note, however, that air carriers have been sharing their track data with certificate management team (CMT) members, and that this information has also been routinely incorporated into your bi-annual air tour safety meetings. We also note that you plan to include a specific presentation on the operational hazards that you have identified in track data during upcoming air tour safety meetings, and that CMTs intend to work collaboratively with industry to approve operator-developed mitigation strategies for any hazards identified. We are encouraged by your actions thus far to collect and analyze track data and your plan to work collaboratively with industry to approve operator-developed hazard mitigation strategies. Pending the completion of these collaborative efforts and our review of any mitigation strategies that may result, Safety Recommendation A-17-42 is classified OPEN--ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: FAA
To: NTSB
Date: 7/21/2017
Response: -From Michael P. Huerta, Administrator: The FAA is addressing these recommendations through bi-annual Air Tour Safety Meetings held in both Juneau and Ketchikan, Alaska. These bi-annual meetings are held before the spring and after the fall air tour seasons and involve FAA, industry stakeholders, leading aviation safety groups, and the Board on occasion. The intent of these meetings is to address safety concerns specific to the air tour industry in Southeast Alaska and to conduct regular presentations around topics such as: airspace changes, automatic dependent surveillance-broadcast (ADS-B), CAPSTONE equipment, mid-air avoidance via Letters of Agreement (LOA), safety cultures, and the CFJT Awareness Initiative. At the 2016 post-season and 2017 pre-season air tour safety meetings the use of updated terrain databases and current software was discussed as requested by this recommendation. As for concerns over legacy Chelton Avionics Systems, the FAA found that operators are using the most current electronic flight instrument system software available. We encourage carriers to continue using updated terrain databases as they become available and will continue to provide operator oversight to ensure systems software use is in accordance with each operator's approved manuals and training programs. We will address this topic again during the 2017 post-season air tour safety meeting. The FAA believes that by ensuring ADS-B data-driven discussions are a focus of future bi-annual safety meetings, additional safety insights will be developed. In evaluating this recommendation we determined there are several po11ions of Ketchikan air tour flight paths where ADS-B data is not available. However. discussions with industry stakeholders indicate that their use of "Spider Tracks" technology, a commercially available GPS tracking tool, allows the air carriers to have full coverage of the entire flight path. Although this coverage is available to the air carriers only, this information has been openly shared with Certificate Management Team (CMT) members and is routinely incorporated into the bi-annual air tour safety meetings. The FAA has also achieved successful results in this area through user/operator LO As, where air carriers operating in a given area voluntarily sign agreements establishing clear procedures, methods, and areas by which they will abide. This voluntary action further enhances aviation safety during the air tour season through the avoidance of both mid-air and CFiT accidents. We will ensure that a specific presentation during both the 2017 post-season and 2018 pre-season air tour safety meetings is focused on any operational hazards reflected in track data. Additionally, the CMTs will work collaboratively with industry to approve operator developed mitigation strategies for any hazards identified. I believe the FAA has effectively addressed these safety recommendations and consider our actions complete.

From: NTSB
To: FAA
Date: 5/9/2017
Response: On April 25, 2017, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) adopted its report concerning the June 25, 2015, accident in which a single-engine, turbine-powered, float-equipped de Havilland DHC-3 (Otter) airplane, N270PA, collided with mountainous, tree-covered terrain about 24 miles east-northeast of Ketchikan, Alaska.1 Additional information about this accident and the resulting recommendations may be found in the report of the investigation, which can be accessed at our website, http://www.ntsb.gov, under report number NTSB/AAR-17/02. As a result of this investigation, we issued 10 new recommendations, including 1 to the Cruise Lines International Association and the following 9 recommendations to the Federal Aviation Administration.