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Safety Recommendation Details

Safety Recommendation R-13-026
Details
Synopsis: On Sunday, June 24, 2012, at 10:02 a.m. central daylight time, eastbound Union Pacific Railroad (UP) freight train ZLAAH-22 and westbound UP freight train AAMMLX-22 collided head-on while operating on straight track on the UP Pratt subdivision near Goodwell, Oklahoma. Skies were clear, the temperature was 89°F, and visibility was 10 miles. The collision derailed 3 locomotives and 24 cars of the eastbound train and 2 locomotives and 8 cars of the westbound train. The engineer and the conductor of the eastbound train and the engineer of the westbound train were killed. The conductor of the westbound train jumped to safety. During the collision and derailment, several fuel tanks from the derailed locomotives ruptured, releasing diesel fuel that ignited and burned. Damage was estimated at $14.8 million. The National Transportation Safety Board determines that the probable cause of this accident was the eastbound Union Pacific Railroad train crew’s lack of response to wayside signals because of the engineer’s inability to see and correctly interpret the signals; the conductor’s disengagement from his duties; and the lack of positive train control, which would have stopped the train and prevented the collision regardless of the crew’s inaction. Contributing to the accident was a medical examination process that failed to decertify the engineer before his deteriorating vision adversely affected his ability to operate a train safely.
Recommendation: TO ALL CLASS I RAILROADS: Install in all controlling locomotive cabs and cab car operating compartments crash-and fire-protected inward-and outward-facing audio and image recorders. The devices should have a minimum 12-hour continuous recording capability.
Original recommendation transmittal letter: PDF
Overall Status: Open - Acceptable Response
Mode: Railroad
Location: Goodwell, OK, United States
Is Reiterated: Yes
Is Hazmat: No
Is NPRM: No
Accident #: DCA12MR005
Accident Reports: Head-On Collision of Two Union Pacific Railroad Freight Trains
Report #: RAR-13-02
Accident Date: 6/24/2012
Issue Date: 8/14/2013
Date Closed:
Addressee(s) and Addressee Status: BNSF Railway Company (formerly Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railway Company) (Open - Acceptable Response)
Canadian National Railway (Open - Acceptable Response)
Canadian Pacific Railway (Open - Acceptable Response)
CSX Transportation, Inc. (Open - Acceptable Response)
Kansas City Southern Railway Company (Open - Await Response)
Norfolk Southern Corporation (Open - Acceptable Response)
Union Pacific (Open - Unacceptable Response)
Keyword(s):

Safety Recommendation History
From: NTSB
To: Canadian National Railway
Date: 7/29/2016
Response: We are encouraged that you are installing inward-facing cameras in ten locomotives in a pilot project in the United States. However, we are concerned about Mr. Berrada’s statement that you are waiting for the FRA to develop standards for device use and installation before full implementation of this recommendation and that the inward-facing image recorders under consideration do not appear to record audio. In order to satisfy Safety Recommendation R-13-26, your installation will need to include both image and audio recording for both inward- and outward-facing recorders. Other railroads have moved forward (for example, UP and Amtrak) without waiting for the FRA’s standards to be developed and implemented. We encourage you to act on this important safety recommendation without delay, and look forward to hearing from you regarding a change in your position. In the meantime, pending your completing the recommended action, Safety Recommendation R-13-26 remains classified OPEN—ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: Canadian National Railway
To: NTSB
Date: 12/8/2015
Response: -From Sam Berrada, Vice-President, CN Safety and Sustainability: CN Update January 20,2014: CN has 2,029locomotives in our fleet, of which 1,855 are currently in active service. Of the 2,029locomotives, 911 are equipped with outward facing cameras. CN has installed 140 to 150 outward facing cameras per year since 2011. It is anticipated that another 150 outward facing cameras will be installed in calendar year 2014. CN plans to continue to equip locomotives with outward facing cameras and audio recording devices beyond 2014. Regarding inward facing camera technology, CN is currently testing hardware and camera set up in locomotive cabs in Canada. CN recently reviewed other Class One carrier's inward facing camera programs and installations. Like other carriers, CN plans to meet with its US-based operating unions to discuss inward facing cameras in the context of applicable collective bargaining agreement terms. CN will thoroughly review various options of implementation and report back to NTSB once that review has concluded and clear direction has been determined. Current CN Update: CN is moving forward with both outward and inward-facing camera technology in the US and is an active member of the rulemaking process with FRA. CN has successfully pilot tested inward-facing cameras on ten locomotives covering two territories. Currently, CN has 1,200 locomotives equipped with outward facing cameras. Ten of those locomotives are equipped with inward facing cameras. CN will continue moving forward with both programs as regulations dictate. Despite our ongoing progress, the industry faces several challenges regarding inward facing locomotive video recorders. One unique CN challenge is cross border operations into Canada. CN does not have a captive locomotive fleet; locomotives cross the border into Canada frequently. Canadian regulation prohibits railroad access to data retrieved by inward facing cameras. CN is actively engaged, working with Canadian regulators and union leaders to allow the use of inward-facing video recorders. At this time, the Canadian ban on access to the data is delaying installation of video recorders on CN locomotives. Additionally, it is unclear what federal requirements and specifications will be mandated by FRA in the US. CN is awaiting clarity from FRA in the form of a notice for proposed rulemaking on hardware specification. CN is committed to installing this technology and will move forward as regulations permit.

From: NTSB
To: Canadian National Railway
Date: 12/8/2014
Response: R-13-026 was reiterated in the report Collision of Union Pacific Railroad Freight Train with BNSF Railway Freight Train near Chaffee, Missouri on May 25, 2013. RAR-14-02, adopted November 17, 2014, notation 8507A, published December 8, 2014. The NTSB is encouraged by railroad company actions to implement inward-facing cameras. However, the NTSB believes that more railroads need to install inward- and outward-facing audio and image recorders to provide reasonable and reliable means to capture valuable information about crewmember activities in locomotive operating compartments during the time before an accident. In the Chaffee accident, audio recorders in the locomotive cab could have recorded the crew calling the signals, and inward-facing cameras could have shown what the crewmembers were doing, or at least where they were and their positions, giving investigators insight into the cab environment and activity. The NTSB therefore reiterates Safety Recommendation R-13-26, issued in response to the Goodwell accident, to all Class 1 railroads.

From: NTSB
To: Canadian National Railway
Date: 3/20/2014
Response: We note that about half of CN’s 2029 (1855 in active service) locomotives are or will be equipped with outward-facing cameras and that you are installing the outward facing cameras at a rate of about 140 to 150 locomotives a year. We also note that you are currently testing inward facing camera hardware and set-up in locomotive cabs in Canada, that you reviewed other Class 1 carriers’ inward-facing camera programs and installations, and that you will meet with US-based operating unions to discuss inward-facing cameras in the context of applicable collective bargaining agreements. Pending completion of the recommended action, Safety Recommendation R-13-26 is classified OPEN--ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: Canadian National Railway
To: NTSB
Date: 1/20/2014
Response: -From Michael Farkouh, Vice President, Safety and Sustainability: CN Response R-13-26: CN’s has 2029 locomotives in our fleet, of which 1855 are currently in active service. Of the 2029 locomotives, 911 are equipped with outward facing cameras. CN has installed 140 to 150 outward facing cameras per year since 2011. It is anticipated that another 150 outward facing cameras will be installed in calendar year 2014. CN plans to continue to equip locomotives with outward facing cameras and audio recording devices beyond 2014. Regarding inward facing camera technology, CN is currently testing hardware and camera set up in locomotive cabs in Canada. CN recently reviewed other Class One carrier’s inward facing camera programs and installations. Like other carriers, CN plans to meet with its US-based operating unions to discuss inward facing cameras in the context of applicable collective bargaining agreement terms. CN will thoroughly review various options of implementation and report back to NTSB once that review has concluded and clear direction has been determined. Please accept this response as “Accepted – Open”.

From: NTSB
To: Canadian Pacific Railway
Date: 8/23/2016
Response: We appreciate you updating us on your progress installing crash- and fire-protected inward- and outward-facing audio and image recorders in controlling locomotive cabs, and we note that you have now installed the recorders in a total of 15 locomotives. Further, we are encouraged that you plan to install inward-facing audio and image recorders in another 50 locomotives this year. Please update us on your progress toward completing your planned installations for this year, and provide us with a proposed schedule for completing any remaining installations beyond that. Pending our receipt of this information and confirmation that recorders have been installed in all of your controlling locomotive cabs and cab car operating compartments, Safety Recommendation R-13-26 is classified OPEN--ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: Canadian Pacific Railway
To: NTSB
Date: 7/19/2016
Response: -From Lori Kennedy, Director, Regulatory Affairs: I am writing to you in response to the National Transportation Safety Board’s (NTSB) September 16, 2015 letter to Canadian Pacific (CP) requesting that CP provide an update on our status of the installation of inward-facing audio and image recorders. CP remains a strong proponent of inward-facing audio and image recorders for controlling locomotives if they can be used for not only the investigation of accidents but also for use by management in carrying out proactive efficiency testing and system-wide performance monitoring programs to PREVENT accidents before they adversely affect our employees or the communities we operate in and through. In order to fully understand crew behavior, both voice and video recorders must be installed within the cab of a locomotive. The proliferation of text messaging in modern day society is but one example of an at risk behavior that would not be identified through voice recordings alone. We are also aware of the plans of the Federal Railroad Administration to issue a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) and expect that these proposed regulations will allow railroad management to use these recorders to conduct proactive efficiency testing and system-wide performance monitoring programs to prevent accidents. If future regulations were to prevent railroads from using these recorders proactively, it would be a detriment to railroad safety. The installations planned for 2015 were delayed but are progressing. At this point in time, CP has completed installation on a total of 15 locomotives. CP currently also has plans to install recorders on an additional 50 locomotives by the end of 2016 but the timing of this is subject to a number of factors and may change. If you or your staff have any questions or would need any additional information please do not hesitate to contact me.

From: NTSB
To: Canadian Pacific Railway
Date: 9/16/2015
Response: We are encouraged that (1) you have deployed inward-facing cameras in 4 of your locomotives, (2) you are scheduling an additional 15 locomotives to be so equipped during 2015, and (3) you have equipped 728 locomotives to date with forward-facing cameras in the front windshield and with microphones outside the cab. We are aware that CP is participating on the Federal Railroad Administration’s Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC) working group to develop standards for the use and installation of such devices. We appreciate CP’s support for this technology, recognizing that it can be used to prevent accidents as well as help investigators identify the causes of accidents that have already occurred. We also appreciate your working with regulatory agencies in Canada and the United States to support the passage of legislation to support these measures. We note that two other railroads operating in the United States—Amtrak and Union Pacific Railroad—have proceeded with the installation of inward- and outward facing recording devices in the controlling compartment of locomotives without waiting for the enactment of such legislation. Meanwhile, we are encouraged that the Federal Railroad Administration plans to issue a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) to address installation requirements for inward and outward facing recording devices, and the use of recordings for accident investigation and railroad safety study purposes. Please update us on your status as you finish installing inward-facing audio and image recorders on the remaining 15 locomotives that were scheduled for installation this year, and your schedule for any remaining installations. Pending our receipt of this information, Safety Recommendation R-13-26 is classified OPEN—ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: Canadian Pacific Railway
To: NTSB
Date: 2/26/2015
Response: -From Robert A. Johnson, Sr. Vice President Operations, Southern Region, Canadian Pacific: I am writing to you in response to the National Transportation Safety Board’s (NTSB) December 8, 2014 letter to Mr. Harrison issuing recommendation R-13-26 to Canadian Pacific. This recommendation promulgated from NTSB’s investigation into the May 25, 2013 in which a Union Pacific Railroad freight train collided with a BNSF Railroad freight train at Rockview Interlocking, where tracks of the two railroads cross near Chaffee, Missouri (Report # RAR-14/02). The recommendation to Canadian Pacific (CP) suggests installation in all controlling locomotive cabs and cab car operating compartments crash and fire-protected inward- and outward-facing audio and image recorders with a minimum 12-hour continuous recording capability. CP is a strong proponent of inward- and outward-facing audio and image recorders for controlling locomotives if they can be used for not only the investigation of accidents but also for use by management in carrying out proactive efficiency testing and system-wide performance monitoring programs to PREVENT accidents before they adversely affect our employees or the communities we operate in and through. In order to fully understand crew behavior, both voice and video recorders must be installed within the cab of a locomotive. The proliferation of text messaging in modern day society is but one example of an at risk behavior that would not be identified through voice recordings alone. Unfortunately, the current legislative environments in both the United States and Canada restricts railroads from using inward facing recording technology as needed despite the fact that these technologies are commonplace in public areas and are used in the interest of public safety in both countries. A locomotive cab should be treated no differently. It is clear that if this technology is used solely to aid investigation post incident after human pain and suffering occurs; we will have failed in our objective to protect the safety of our employees, the public and the environment. As a railroad with significant operations in the United States and Canada, legislation must be changed and harmonized in both countries to allow CP to progress in this area. As part of CP’s efforts to try to progress in this area and while not required, CP has chosen to equip many of our locomotives (728 to date) with forward facing cameras in the front windshield and microphones outside the cab. In late 2013, CP equipped 4 locomotives with inward facing recording devices and initiated a US pilot project. Despite challenges with operating these locomotives cross border, CP is continuing to try to progress this project and in 2015, is planning to equip 15 more locomotives with inward facing recording devices. Additionally, CP is working with regulatory agencies in Canada and the US to try to effect legislative and regulatory change, including being a participant in the Federal Railroad Administration’s Railroad Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC) Working Group on Inward and Outward Facing Recording Devices Mounted in Controlling Locomotive Cabs (Task #14-01). As you can see from the attached task statement, this group is expressly charged with developing “regulatory recommendations addressing the installation and use of recording devices in controlling locomotive cabs. These recommendations should address installation requirements and timelines, technical controls, recording retention periods, retrieval of recordings, controlled custody of recordings, crashworthiness standards, use of recordings for accident investigation and railroad safety study purposes, and use of recordings in conducting operational tests.” If these future regulatory requirements restrict use or set prescriptive and expensive requirements that reduce the overall safety benefit, it would further deter CP from installing additional recording devices. In summary, while CP believes that there is a compelling safety case to be made in support of the implementation of this technology, we are proceeding cautiously on the installation of any additional inward facing audio and image recorders until both the United States and Canadian Federal Governments have taken sufficient steps that will permit the use of such technology both for postaccident investigation and compliance monitoring. Strong leadership on the part of the Federal Government is required to pave the way for CP and the rest of the industry to invest in this safety critical technology. In light of the aforementioned, I respectfully request that recommendation R-13-26 be classified closed– acceptable alternate action. If you or your staff have any questions or would need any additional information please do not hesitate to contact me. Thank you and I look forward to hearing from you in the near future.

From: NTSB
To: Canadian Pacific Railway
Date: 12/8/2014
Response: R-13-026 was reiterated in the report Collision of Union Pacific Railroad Freight Train with BNSF Railway Freight Train near Chaffee, Missouri on May 25, 2013. RAR-14-02, adopted November 17, 2014, notation 8507A, published December 8, 2014. The NTSB is encouraged by railroad company actions to implement inward-facing cameras. However, the NTSB believes that more railroads need to install inward- and outward-facing audio and image recorders to provide reasonable and reliable means to capture valuable information about crewmember activities in locomotive operating compartments during the time before an accident. In the Chaffee accident, audio recorders in the locomotive cab could have recorded the crew calling the signals, and inward-facing cameras could have shown what the crewmembers were doing, or at least where they were and their positions, giving investigators insight into the cab environment and activity. The NTSB therefore reiterates Safety Recommendation R-13-26, issued in response to the Goodwell accident, to all Class 1 railroads.

From: NTSB
To: BNSF Railway Company (formerly Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railway Company)
Date: 12/8/2014
Response: R-13-026 was reiterated in the report Collision of Union Pacific Railroad Freight Train with BNSF Railway Freight Train near Chaffee, Missouri on May 25, 2013. RAR-14-02, adopted November 17, 2014, notation 8507A, published December 8, 2014. The NTSB is encouraged by railroad company actions to implement inward-facing cameras. However, the NTSB believes that more railroads need to install inward- and outward-facing audio and image recorders to provide reasonable and reliable means to capture valuable information about crewmember activities in locomotive operating compartments during the time before an accident. In the Chaffee accident, audio recorders in the locomotive cab could have recorded the crew calling the signals, and inward-facing cameras could have shown what the crewmembers were doing, or at least where they were and their positions, giving investigators insight into the cab environment and activity. The NTSB therefore reiterates Safety Recommendation R-13-26, issued in response to the Goodwell accident, to all Class 1 railroads.

From: NTSB
To: BNSF Railway Company (formerly Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railway Company)
Date: 12/24/2013
Response: We are aware that BNSF uses outward-facing image recorders, and we encourage you to continue your efforts to install inward-facing audio and image recorders as well. Your letter did not mention the recommended recorders, which are protected from crashes and fires. Although both locomotives involved in the Goodwell, Oklahoma, accident and the lead locomotive in the April 17, 2011, Red Oak, Iowa, accident had outward-facing video cameras, the video from both accidents was unavailable to investigators because the recorded data had not been stored in crashworthy memory modules and were therefore lost in the collisions and subsequent fires. The Goodwell accident clearly demonstrated that in-cab audio and video data, if sufficiently protected from fire and crash damage, could have provided information to help investigators understand the actions of the crewmembers. Pending the installation of crash- and fire-protected inward- and outward-facing audio and image recorders, Safety Recommendation R-13-26 is classified OPEN--ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: BNSF Railway Company (formerly Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railway Company)
To: NTSB
Date: 11/5/2013
Response: -From Mark A. Schulze, Vice President, Safety, Training and Operations Support: BNSF is committed to using technology to improve the safety of our rail operations. As you are aware, BNSF has already implemented a variety of technologies to support risk reduction programs in order to improve the safety of our rail operations including the following: Outward-facing image recorders in locomotives, Locomotive event recorders with remote review capabilities, Audio recordings of field radio base station, Audio recordings of train dispatcher audio communications and Inward-facing cameras in various road based vehicles. Additionally, BNSF continues to take a leadership role in the design, development and implementation of positive train control (PTC) and its related technologies. Consistent with our experience that these identified technologies that we have already implemented and others in development have improved safety, BNSF believes that implementing inward facing locomotive cameras consistent with NTSB recommendation R-13-26 can also improve operational safety. BNSF is currently benchmarking other railroad's implementation plans and we are analyzing product capabilities of inward-facing camera technology. We will continue to assess the technology for implementation and will keep the NTSB apprised as we progress this initiative.

From: NTSB
To: CSX Transportation, Inc.
Date: 12/8/2014
Response: R-13-026 was reiterated in the report Collision of Union Pacific Railroad Freight Train with BNSF Railway Freight Train near Chaffee, Missouri on May 25, 2013. RAR-14-02, adopted November 17, 2014, notation 8507A, published December 8, 2014. The NTSB is encouraged by railroad company actions to implement inward-facing cameras. However, the NTSB believes that more railroads need to install inward- and outward-facing audio and image recorders to provide reasonable and reliable means to capture valuable information about crewmember activities in locomotive operating compartments during the time before an accident. In the Chaffee accident, audio recorders in the locomotive cab could have recorded the crew calling the signals, and inward-facing cameras could have shown what the crewmembers were doing, or at least where they were and their positions, giving investigators insight into the cab environment and activity. The NTSB therefore reiterates Safety Recommendation R-13-26, issued in response to the Goodwell accident, to all Class 1 railroads.

From: NTSB
To: CSX Transportation, Inc.
Date: 12/27/2013
Response: We are aware that CSXT uses outward-facing image recorders, and we encourage you to continue your efforts to install inward-facing audio and image recorders as well. Your letter mentioned that the recommended recorders will be protected from crashes and fires according to the Association of American Railroads’ recommended practices, which are being addressed in response to NTSB Safety Recommendation R-12-24. Although both locomotives involved in the Goodwell, Oklahoma, accident?and the lead locomotive in the April 17, 2011, Red Oak, Iowa, accident?had outward-facing video cameras, the video from both accidents was unavailable to investigators because the recorded data had not been stored in crashworthy memory modules and were therefore lost in the collisions and subsequent fires. The Goodwell accident clearly demonstrated that in-cab audio and video data, if sufficiently protected from fire and crash damage, could have provided information to help investigators understand the actions of the crewmembers. Pending the installation of crash- and fire-protected inward- and outward-facing audio and image recorders, Safety Recommendation R-13-26 is classified OPEN--ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: CSX Transportation, Inc.
To: NTSB
Date: 11/8/2013
Response: -From Jim Marks, Vice President of Safety and Field Career Development: CSXT already has installed outward-facing video and audio recorders on the great majority of its road locomotives, and is continuing the process of installing this equipment. CSXT has also made the decision to install inward-facing cameras with a minimum 12-hour continuous recording capability in its locomotives. Details such as the type of equipment to be utilized and installation schedule are currently being finalized, but we expect this program to commence in the near future. Crash protection for such recording devices will be addressed by the Association of American Railroads (AAR) in connection with NTSB Recommendation R-12-24.

From: NTSB
To: Kansas City Southern Railway Company
Date: 12/8/2014
Response: R-13-026 was reiterated in the report Collision of Union Pacific Railroad Freight Train with BNSF Railway Freight Train near Chaffee, Missouri on May 25, 2013. RAR-14-02, adopted November 17, 2014, notation 8507A, published December 8, 2014. The NTSB is encouraged by railroad company actions to implement inward-facing cameras. However, the NTSB believes that more railroads need to install inward- and outward-facing audio and image recorders to provide reasonable and reliable means to capture valuable information about crewmember activities in locomotive operating compartments during the time before an accident. In the Chaffee accident, audio recorders in the locomotive cab could have recorded the crew calling the signals, and inward-facing cameras could have shown what the crewmembers were doing, or at least where they were and their positions, giving investigators insight into the cab environment and activity. The NTSB therefore reiterates Safety Recommendation R-13-26, issued in response to the Goodwell accident, to all Class 1 railroads.

From: NTSB
To: Kansas City Southern Railway Company
Date: 7/29/2014
Response: We apologize for inadvertently providing the incorrect text for Safety Recommendations R 13-26 and -27 in our May 13, 2014, letter; the text above is correct. We would appreciate learning what actions you have taken to address these recommendations. Pending our receipt of your response, they are classified OPEN—AWAIT RESPONSE.

From: Kansas City Southern Railway Company
To: NTSB
Date: 6/10/2014
Response: -From Steven E. Truitt, Vice President Safety and Standards: In reference to R-13-26 and -27, I would like to ask for clarification before offering a response. The letter addressed to Mr. Starling May 13, 2014 reflects the issues as follows: R-13-26 Implement a program consistent with principles of safety management systems to periodically test all aspects of your internal emergency communication system to ensure that personnel are familiar with the system’s operation and that emergency notifications can be communicated immediately to any chief dispatcher or rail traffic controller in your system. R-13-27 Examine and revise your post-accident toxicological testing program to ensure that rail traffic controllers are tested unless there is clear and convincing evidence that they were not involved in the accident. However a letter addressed to Mr. Starling on August 14, 2013, which was retrieved from the NTSB website illustrates the same recommendation numbers differently: R-13-26 Install in all controlling locomotive cabs and cab car operating compartments crash-and fire protected inward-and outward-facing audio and image recorders. The devices should have a minimum 12-hour continuous recording capability. The NTSB also issued the following recommendation to all railroads—including Kansas City Southern—subject to the positive train control provisions of the Rail Safety Improvement Act of 2008: R-13-27 Provide positive train control implementation update reports to the Federal Railroad Administration every 6 months until positive train control implementation is complete. The update reports should consist of two sections: components and training. The components section should include a description of the positive train control component to be implemented, the number of components, the number of components completed on the report date, the number of components that remain to be completed, the overall completion percentage, and the estimated completion date. Components are defined as locomotives, wayside units, switches, base station radios, wayside radios, locomotive radios, and any new and novel technologies that are part of a positive train control system. The training section shall include the number of safety-related employees and equivalent railroad carrier contractors and subcontractors that need to be trained, by class and craft; minimum training standards for those employees and contractors, meaning the knowledge of and ability to comply with federal railroad safety laws and regulations and carrier rules and procedures to implement positive train control; the percentage of employees who have completed training; the percentage of employees who remain to be trained; and the estimated date that training will be completed.

From: NTSB
To: Kansas City Southern Railway Company
Date: 5/13/2014
Response: We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others. Because we have received no reply from you regarding Safety Recommendation R-13-16, -26 or -27, these recommendations are classified OPEN—UNACCEPTABLE RESPONSE. Please inform us within 90 days regarding actions you have either taken or plan to take to implement them, preferably electronically.

From: NTSB
To: Kansas City Southern Railway Company
Date: 12/18/2013
Response: We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others. Normally, we expect action to address our recommendations to be completed within 5 years. Because we have received no reply from the KCSR regarding Safety Recommendations R-07-30, R-13-16, or R-13-26 or -27, please inform us within 90 days about the status of actions to implement them, preferably electronically at the following e-mail address: correspondence@ntsb.gov.

From: NTSB
To: Norfolk Southern Corporation
Date: 5/4/2015
Response: We are aware that you employ the use of outward-facing image recorders in your locomotive cabs and cab car operating compartments, and we are encouraged that you are considering the installation of inward-facing audio and image recorders as well. We are also aware that the Rail Safety Advisory Committee has established a working group to develop recommendations regarding the installation and use of inward- and outward-facing recording devices. We are pleased that NS is participating in this working group and look forward to learning the results of the group’s work, once its report becomes available for review. In the meantime, pending completion of the recommended action, Safety Recommendation R-13-26 is classified OPEN—ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: Norfolk Southern Corporation
To: NTSB
Date: 12/10/2014
Response: -From Mark Manion, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer: This is in reply to your letter to C. Wick Moorman, Chief Executive Officer, Norfolk Southern Corporation, dated December 8, 2014, regarding R- 13 -26. On March 6, 2014, the Rail Safety Advisory Committee (RSAC) voted to establish an "Inward /Outward- Facing Recording Device Working Group charged with developing recommendations addressing all matters related to the development of regulatory standards governing the installation and use of inward and outward- facing recording devices in controlling locomotive cabs, including economic data required for regulatory analyses. Norfolk Southern is actively participating in this RSAC Working Group with a targeted report out of April 1, 2015, to the Federal Railroad Administration. Additionally, Norfolk Southern already employs the use of outward -facing image recorders (RailView) and is currently analyzing the safety benefits, costs, and employee concerns related to privacy and collective bargaining associated with the installation of inward -facing cameras. Although a final decision has not been made, Norfolk Southern anticipates a phased implementation of inward -facing cameras in the future. This implementation will be based, in part, on any regulatory requirements and /or recommendations of this RSAC Working Group.

From: NTSB
To: Norfolk Southern Corporation
Date: 12/8/2014
Response: R-13-026 was reiterated in the report Collision of Union Pacific Railroad Freight Train with BNSF Railway Freight Train near Chaffee, Missouri on May 25, 2013. RAR-14-02, adopted November 17, 2014, notation 8507A, published December 8, 2014. The NTSB is encouraged by railroad company actions to implement inward-facing cameras. However, the NTSB believes that more railroads need to install inward- and outward-facing audio and image recorders to provide reasonable and reliable means to capture valuable information about crewmember activities in locomotive operating compartments during the time before an accident. In the Chaffee accident, audio recorders in the locomotive cab could have recorded the crew calling the signals, and inward-facing cameras could have shown what the crewmembers were doing, or at least where they were and their positions, giving investigators insight into the cab environment and activity. The NTSB therefore reiterates Safety Recommendation R-13-26, issued in response to the Goodwell accident, to all Class 1 railroads.

From: NTSB
To: Norfolk Southern Corporation
Date: 12/27/2013
Response: We are aware that NS uses outward-facing image recorders, and we encourage you to continue your efforts to install inward-facing audio and image recorders as well. Your letter did not mention whether the recommended recorders are protected from crashes and fires. Although both locomotives involved in the Goodwell, Oklahoma, accident and the lead locomotive in the April 17, 2011, Red Oak, Iowa, accident had outward-facing video cameras, the video from both accidents was unavailable because the recorded data had not been stored in crashworthy memory modules and were therefore lost in the collisions and subsequent fires. The Goodwell accident clearly demonstrated that in-cab audio and video data, if sufficiently protected from fire and crash damage, could have provided information to help investigators understand the actions of the crew. Pending the installation of crash- and fire protected inward- and outward-facing audio and image recorders, Safety Recommendation R-13-26 is classified OPEN—ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: Norfolk Southern Corporation
To: NTSB
Date: 8/27/2013
Response: -From C.W. Moorman, Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer: As you know, Norfolk Southern already employs the use of outward-facing image recorders (RaiiView®). Additionally, we are in the early stages of analyzing the safety benefits, costs, and employee concerns related to privacy and collective bargaining associated with the installation of inward-facing audio and image recorders. Although a final decision has not been made, Norfolk Southern continues to assess this technology and will keep the NTSB apprised.

From: NTSB
To: Union Pacific
Date: 10/4/2018
Response: We are encouraged that you have installed 4,936 crash- and fire-protected inward facing cameras in your controlling locomotive cabs; however, our recommendation also called for audio recording capability, outward facing image recorders, and 12-hour continuous recording capability. Please tell us when you plan to install audio recorders or activate the audio capability of the currently installed inward-facing image recorders, and inform us of any plans you have concerning outward facing image and audio recorders, and whether such recorders will provide for 12-hour continuous recording capability, which was not addressed in your incoming correspondence. We would also appreciate notice when the installations are complete. Pending our receipt of that information, Safety Recommendation R 13 26 remains classified OPEN--UNACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: Union Pacific
To: NTSB
Date: 5/8/2018
Response: -From Rodney N. Doerr, Vice President-Safety, Chief Safety Officer: Since our last update, Union Pacific has continued to install inward facing cameras, and the current number of locomotives equipped is now at 4,936, and is certainly industry leading in terms of installation and use. Our intent remains to equip our entire fleet. Additionally, 4,056 of these cameras are contained within crash hardened memory modules, rendering them crash and fire protected. As PTC installation of locomotives components is finished, all cameras will ultimately be upgraded and be crash and fire protected. This upgrade will be completed by the end of 2018. As stated previously, although the installations include audio capabilities, at this time Union Pacific does not intend to enable that function. Union Pacific welcomes the opportunity to communicate with you regarding the status of NTSB’s recommendations. We appreciate the dedication of your investigative professionals, their pursuit of meaningful recommendations, and their tireless commitment to safety. We look forward to working with you in the future. Should you have additional questions or need any assistance in the future, please do not hesitate to contact me.

From: NTSB
To: Union Pacific
Date: 1/25/2018
Response: We are encouraged that you have installed 3,699 inward-facing cameras in your controlling locomotive cabs and cab car operating compartments; however, our recommendation also called for audio recording capability and outward facing image recorders. Please tell us if you plan to install audio recorders or to activate the audio capability of the currently installed inward-facing image recorders. Additionally, please let us know if the recorders are crash- and fire-protected, and inform us of any plans you have concerning outward facing image and audio recorders. Pending our receipt of this information, Safety Recommendation R 13 26 is classified OPEN--UNACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: Union Pacific
To: NTSB
Date: 5/2/2017
Response: -From Rodney Doerr, Vice President- Safety, Chief Safety Officer: Since our last update, Union Pacific has continued to install inward facing cameras, and the current number of locomotives equipped is now at 3,699, and is certainly industry leading in terms of installation and use. Our intent remains to equip our entire fleet. As stated previously, although the installations include audio capabilities, at this time Union Pacific does not intend to enable that function.

From: NTSB
To: Union Pacific
Date: 3/27/2017
Response: We are encouraged that you have installed 2,096 inward-facing cameras; however, our recommendation called for audio as well as video recording capability, and we would like to confirm that sound is also being recorded in your locomotives. In addition, please inform us of how many more locomotives need audio and image recorders and what your schedule is for the remaining installations. Pending our receipt of this information, Safety Recommendation R 13 26 remains classified OPEN--ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: Union Pacific
To: NTSB
Date: 12/16/2015
Response: -From Rodney N. Doerr, Vice President-Safety, Chief Safety Officer, Union Pacific: To date, Union Pacific has installed 2,096 inward facing cameras, all of which surpass NTSB's recommendation for 12 continuous hours of recording. Union Pacific intends to continue installation of these cameras throughout its locomotive fleet.

From: NTSB
To: Union Pacific
Date: 10/26/2015
Response: This letter concerns the 12 open safety recommendations that the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) issued to the Union Pacific Railroad (UP) between 2006 and 2014. Enclosure 1 is a list of these recommendations; Enclosure 2 is a copy of the correspondence history regarding them. Based on information contained in your February 24, 2015, update, Safety Recommendations R 13 26 and R-14-56 were classified “Open—Acceptable Response,” on August 3, 2015. See Enclosures 3 and 4. We are concerned because we have not received updates regarding action either taken or planned to address the remaining 10 open recommendations for some time?in some cases, for nearly 5 years; for others, not at all. We are interested in knowing whether and how our recommendations are implemented, both to ensure that the traveling public is provided the highest level of safety and to identify creative solutions that might be shared with others. Accordingly, we request an update as soon as possible regarding your plans or actions to address these 10 remaining recommendations.

From: NTSB
To: Union Pacific
Date: 9/3/2015
Response: We are encouraged that you deployed inward-facing cameras in 135 of your locomotives and scheduled an additional 185 to 200 locomotives to be so equipped during the first quarter of 2015. Please note that our recommendation called for audio as well as video recording capability; we would like to confirm that sound is being recorded. We would also like to learn whether you were able to meet that schedule, how many additional locomotives need audio and image recorders to be installed, and what your schedule is for the remaining installations. Pending our receipt of this information, Safety Recommendation R-13-26 is classified OPEN—ACCEPTABLE RESPONSE.

From: Union Pacific
To: NTSB
Date: 2/24/2015
Response: -From Robert M. Grimaila, Vice President, Safety; Chief Safety Officer: Thank you for your correspondence of December 8, 2014, detailing NTSB's recent safety recommendations in connection with report number RAR-14/02 concerning the May 25, 2013 collision in which a Union Pacific freight train collided with a BNSF freight train at Rockview Interlocking near Chaffee, Missouri. Your correspondence requests a response related to two NTSB recommendations: R-14-56, accelerated crew resource management training for safety-sensitive employees; and R-13-26, which requests operation of inward facing image recorders in locomotive cabs. I am happy to provide NTSB with an update on Union Pacific's response to these recommendations. First, with regard to R-14-56, I am pleased to report that Union Pacific has delivered expanded Crew Resource training to its train crew professionals through Annual Operating Training. In 2014, 780 train crew supervisors cycled through this classroom training, with an additional 23,694 train crew members trained through our Computer Based Training (CBT). These expanded training programs included information on Cab Red Zone, Cab Communications, Technical Proficiency, and Situational Awareness. Finally, with regard to R-13-26, Union Pacific has been deploying inward facing cameras in its locomotives throughout 2014. As of years' end 1351ocomotives were equipped in 2014, and an additional185 to 200 locomotives are scheduled to be equipped by the first quarter of 2015. Union Pacific believes these cameras can deliver significant safety benefits and provide information leading to increased understanding of crew behavior during critical incidents. Thank you for the opportunity to highlight Union Pacific's commitment to safety. We appreciate the opportunity to share with NTSB our dedication to the continued safety of our employees and the communities we serve.

From: NTSB
To: Union Pacific
Date: 12/8/2014
Response: R-13-026 was reiterated in the report Collision of Union Pacific Railroad Freight Train with BNSF Railway Freight Train near Chaffee, Missouri on May 25, 2013. RAR-14-02, adopted November 17, 2014, notation 8507A, published December 8, 2014. The NTSB is encouraged by railroad company actions to implement inward-facing cameras. However, the NTSB believes that more railroads need to install inward- and outward-facing audio and image recorders to provide reasonable and reliable means to capture valuable information about crewmember activities in locomotive operating compartments during the time before an accident. In the Chaffee accident, audio recorders in the locomotive cab could have recorded the crew calling the signals, and inward-facing cameras could have shown what the crewmembers were doing, or at least where they were and their positions, giving investigators insight into the cab environment and activity. The NTSB therefore reiterates Safety Recommendation R-13-26, issued in response to the Goodwell accident, to all Class 1 railroads.